Recipe: White Beans and Kale (Patton Valley Vineyard)

#WVCELLARSEASON


“A friend made a variation on this for me on New Years Day many years ago. It was so simple, hearty, delicious, and packed with flavor that I vowed to remember it forever. This version, cobbled together from dusty memories and long-forgotten exactitude, is what I have been making on cold nights ever since.

I’d be lying if I said Pinot noir was the perfect pairing so I won’t. Pinot gris, blanc, or a dry Riesling, Melon, or Gewürztraminer would be my pick here. If you have a unicorn bottle of the 2007 Francis Tannahill Dragonfly lying around, for example…” – Mike Willison, National Sales Manager

Learn more about Patton Valley Vineyard

White Beans and Kale

Servings 4

Ingredients

  • 1 can Great Northern beans
  • 1 bunch Lacinato Kale de-ribbed and chopped
  • 4 links Italian sausage sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic chopped, divided
  • 2 oz olive oil divided
  • 4 slices good bread, such as Como

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350F. Heat a large pan over a medium high flame. Add 1oz of olive oil and 1 garlic clove as it heats, stirring to prevent sticking.

  2. Add the sausage, and brown each side, about 12 minutes. While doing so, put the bread on a sheet pan, divide the remaining garlic and olive oil amongst the slices, and toast in the oven until just brown; remove from the oven.

  3. Add the beans to the pan and stir to incorporate. Lower the heat to medium. Add the Kale to the pan and stir to incorporate. If desired, add about 1oz of crushed red pepper to the pan.

  4. When the kale is bright green, remove the pan from the heat. Divide and serve over crusty toast.


Recipe: Sopa de Feijão (Coelho Winery)

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Now that the weather is turning colder and our thoughts are turning to hearty red wine, there’s nothing much better on a cold night than bean soup. Here’s a fresh take on a classic Portuguese bean soup that will pair well with any of our red wines.

Pairing: Coelho Winery Tradição Portuguese Red Blend
Learn more about Coehlo Winery

Sopa de Feijão (Portuguese White Bean Soup)

Ingredients

  • olive oil
  • 1 small yellow onion diced
  • 1 small carrot diced
  • 1 stalk celery
  • 4 cloves garlic minced
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1/2 tsp ground fennel seed
  • 2 15.5 oz cans white beans drained
  • 2 cups chicken stock
  • salt and pepper to taste

Garnish

  • 1 5- to 6-ounce stick linguiça quartered and diced
  • 1 yellow potato diced medium
  • 2 collard leaves destemmed, rolled, and finely slivered

Instructions

  1. Over high flame, heat a heavy-bottomed pan large enough to make a pot of soup. Film it with olive oil and cook the vegetables, garlic, bay leaves, and fennel seed until the onions start to go translucent, about five minutes. Add the white beans and chicken stock and simmer for 20-30 minutes, until the vegetables are soft.

  2. Remove the bay leaves and smooth the soup with an immersion blender (or blend it in a blender and return it to the pot). Thin the soup as necessary with more stock or water and season to taste.

  3. For the garnish, film a sauté pan with a little olive oil and cook the linguiça. Remove the linguiça from the pan and cook the potato in the linguiça oil, browning nicely. Pour off some of the colored oil for garnish, then add the linguica, potato, and collards to the soup and simmer until the collards are bright green and just done. Portion into soup bowls and drizzle with the reserved linguiça oil. Serves four as an appetizer or two as a main course with crusty bread.


Why Cellar Season?

#WVcellarseason – January 1, 2019

Once January hits, it can feel as though all of wine country has paused to catch a breath, and it’s not as easy to see what’s happening in the very important next step of the winemaking process… Read full article


What is Cellar Season?

Why Do We Call It Cellar Season?

The Very Important Next Step

During harvest, winemaking is front and center: visitors to most wineries can see grapes being crushed, tanks being punched down, and barrels being filled. But once January hits, it can feel as though all of wine country has paused to catch a breath, and it’s not as easy to see what’s happening in the very important next step of the winemaking process.

That’s Cellar Season — the time of year when wines are undergoing the slower maturation process in barrel or tank after their comparatively fast fermentation. And just like the wines, industry folks from the tasting room to the production team are turning their focus on rejuvenation, hospitality and reflection.

“I give in to the cyclical nature of wine life,” says Jessica Mozeico, winemaker and co-owner at Et Fille Wines. “Yes, we are busy during the fall and we annoy our friends because we can’t schedule anything other than wine, but then winter comes and it is time to introspect, taste through barrels in silence, think and plan for the year.”

The Quiet Energy of Cellar Season

There’s a quiet energy to the Cellar Season that complements tranquil rainfall and brisk winter chill, and it carries through from the production team to the hospitality staff. “I love cozying up by the fire with our sparkling wines and ports,” says Katie Bass, tasting room manager and wine club manager at Eola Hills Wine Cellars. She adds, “I plan monthly trainings to keep us on our toes and to prep for the busy season. Getting out and about with the team is so valuable: tasting adventures to other wineries, breweries and distilleries, sledding expeditions, and maybe even an escape room outing!”

The wines made from the most recent harvest spend this time in barrel or tank to undergo their secondary (malolactic) fermentation, which affects all red wines and many white wines and creates a smooth texture. This also gives the new wines time to integrate their flavors, and if they’re in oak it’s a crucial process of slowly harmonizing fruit, earth and other characteristics with the aromas and texture that oak itself lends.

By February and March, the red wines of previous vintages are often ready to come out of barrel, and white wines designed for spring drinking and made in a fresh, oak-free style—such as many Pinot gris and almost all Riesling wines—are also ready for the bottling line. Bottling is the first really high-energy time of the winemaking year, and the excitement of the growing season to come is in the air. Meanwhile, there’s no better time to experience the tasting room; wineries take this time of year to focus on intimate and in-depth experiences for their guests, whether they’re seminars, winemaker dinners or barrel tastings.

 

Photo: Elizabeth Chambers Cellars


At Montinore, Maialata Celebrates Food and Life

#WVcellarseason – february 27, 2018

For centuries, the people of rural Northern Italy have taken advantage of the darkest time of year by processing pigs into charcuterie, and sausage, ribs, and roasts that would keep over the harsh winter. This community task ended with a feast celebrating family and hard work… Read full article


Oregon Chardonnay Shows Its Diversity

#WVcellarseason – february 27, 2018

Chardonnay has spent the last several years in the midst of a worldwide rebirth, and Willamette Valley Chardonnay is no exception. While “cool-climate” Chardonnaya response to the ABC (“anything but Chardonnay”) refrain that emphasizes high acid and minimal oak and malolactic influenceshas been emerging for several years in places like New Zealand and Niagara… Read full article


Oregon Chardonnay Shows Its Diversity

Oregon Chardonnay Shows Its Diversity

Chardonnay has spent the last several years in the midst of a worldwide rebirth, and Willamette Valley Chardonnay is no exception. While “cool-climate” Chardonnaya response to the ABC (“anything but Chardonnay”) refrain that emphasizes high acid and minimal oak and malolactic influenceshas been emerging for several years in places like New Zealand and Niagara, the Willamette Valley’s Old World obsession with clonal selection and individual terroir expression has merged with the local creativity and community spirit that has winemakers experimenting with clay amphorae, creating special collaboration Chardonnay lots with their friends for the upcoming Willamette Auction, and demonstrating that there’s no need to try to fit Chardonnay in a single box.

The press has noticed. “Historically, there are two main camps: the New World, heavily oaked, buttery and rich Chardonnays; and the elegant, detailed, mineral-­driven Old World styles,” wrote Paul Gregutt for Wine Enthusiast in January. “Oregon’s vintners can emulate the best of both worlds, while producing distinctive, place-specific wines.” Chardonnays made a strong showing in PDX Monthly’s “50 Oregon Wines You Need To Drink Right Now” in October, with promises to “convert Chardonnay haters.” And last weekend’s Oregon Chardonnay Celebration at the Allison in Newberg demonstrated that our winemakers are just getting started.

A seminar on the many styles of Chardonnay, moderated by Patrick Comiskey of Wine & Spirits and featuring Josh Bergström, Jason Lett, Anna Matzinger, John Paul, Wynne Peterson-Nedry, and Thomas Savre, discussed the thousands of decisions that face winemakers, from barrel use to whole-cluster fermentation to clonal selection, in making extraordinary Chardonnay across the spectrum of styles these winemakers represent. Afterward, a walk-around tasting allowed guests to sample 2015 and 2016 Chardonnayssome not even released yetfrom 50 local wineries. From lush, juicy styles to the most delicate, acid-driven examples, Willamette Valley Chardonnay may be one of the world’s most versatile examples of this legendary grape. Browse wineries working with Chardonnay here

 

By Julia Burke

Julia Burke is a wine lover originally from Buffalo, New York, who moved to Oregon in August 2017 to work a harvest and decided to stay. She is the Willamette Valley Wineries Association’s marketing and content coordinator and a fan of Riesling, peanut butter, and the Chicago Cubs.

 


Cellar Season in McMinnville

#WVcellarseason – february 13, 2018

Both an AVA and one of the best wine country towns in America, McMinnville is one of the Willamette Valley’s true gems. February is the inaugural Taste McMinnville Month, a chance to explore the history, shopping, dining, and wine tasting experiences the town known affectionately as “Mac” has to offer… Read full article